Category Archives: Posts in English

Information & Consultancy Services

English / 日本語

I provide the following services:

  • provide information on Scotland in Japanese through my website, scotlandjoho.com, including:
    • Scotland FAQ – travel and living information and advice
    • Scotland News – what’s happening in Scotland
    • Fudangi no Scotland – what it’s like to live in Scotland
  • write about Scotland for the Japanese media, including:
    • Scotland – A Mystery and Fantasy Tour
    • Fudangi no Scotland
    • World 100 Cities: Scotland – Edinburgh & Glasgow
  • help other writers, translators, editors, TV production people, etc., by providing information about Scotland
    • Free information service. If the information is required as part of publishing/production work, I ask that my name be credited, with my website address, as acknowledgement.
    • Research services (hourly research fees apply)
    • Translation services (standard translation fees apply). Please note that copyright clearance must be obtained in order to use the translation in publication – please ask for details.
  • work with companies and organisations in Scotland who wish to promote themselves in Japan
    • Translation/interpreting services
    • Consultancy/advisory services
    • Branding services in conjunction with Brand Horizons

Contact Me

2014年4月20日発表の世論調査結果(ツイートまとめ)

あとでまとめて何か書くつもりですが、とりあえずメモとしてツイートまとめておきます。

Scottish independence poll:Yes on brink of victory – The Scotsman:

 

Scottish independence poll:
最新調査結果はNo 42%、Yes 39%、DK 19%。DK除くとNo 52%、Yes 48%。今回はスコットランド在住イングランド人の回答を分けて出してるのが新しい。初めて?

 

Scottish independence poll:
イングランド人はNo 58%、Yes 28%。スコットランド人はNo 40%、Yes 42%。この結果自体がYesキャンペーンの追い風になる可能性もあるなあ。

 

Scottish independence poll::
他にも色々面白い数字が出てるな、この記事。「No回答者の10%、Yes回答者の18%は、気が変わるかもと言っている」とか「労働党投票者の24%がYesと回答」とか。

 

Scottish independence poll:
「No回答者の38%は自治の拡大を望んでいる」「No回答者の4%は、自治拡大の見込みがないならYesに転じる」というのもなかなか興味深い。両キャンペーンのこれからの舵切りに注目。

 

 より、スコットランド独立世論調査結果の推移(1) Embedded image permalink

 

 より、スコットランド独立世論調査結果の推移(2)決めていない、答えたくない等の回答を除外したYes/No限定のグラフ。 Embedded image permalink

 

まあ普通に考えれば、当日にはDKの人は大体Noを選び、心変わりした人も含めると結局Noがすんなり勝利というのがいちばんありそうなシナリオなんだけど、2007年の選挙の時にもまさかあり得ないよねーと言ってるうちにSNPが滑り込み勝利したので、どっちに転ぶかホントにわからない。

“UK/Scottish Cultural Consultant”

… is what I’ve got printed on my business card.

I quit my job in Scotland to come to Japan with my husband and decided to go freelance rather than look for another in-house position. So I had to print some cards, and after some pondering – should I include “interpreter” or “writer”? would “language services” be a good idea? – I went for this:

Yuno Dinnie
Translator
UK/Scottish Cultural Consultant

The last one naturally attracts most attention when I give my card, and not just because of its wordy length. “What sort of work do you do as a consult then?” is the question, and I included that line to solicit this very question.

So what do I do? Basically, what I am hoping to achieve is to be someone to whom people would turn for information about Scotland (and the UK). I want to tell people in Japan about Scotland, that’s me – a self-appointed PR officer for Scotland in Japan. My website, Scotlandjoho.com, is my platform for this activity, and I write stuff (in Japanese) about Scotland on my blog (Scotland FAQ, Scotland News) as part of my job in this capacity.

In addition to the things I do on the Internet, I also:

  • work as a writer, writing about Scotland
  • help other writers, translators, editors, TV production people, etc., by providing information about Scotland
  • work with companies and organisations in Scotland who wish to promote themselves in Japan

To expand a bit on the second line of work:

  • If I can answer questions using the information/knowledge I already have, I do so free of charge. If the information is required as part of publishing/production work, I ask that my name be credited, with my website address, as acknowledgement.
  • If I need to conduct research, I charge an hourly research fee.
  • If translation is required, I charge my standard translation fee. Please note that copyright clearance must be obtained in order to use the translation in publication – please ask for details.

So far I’ve only answered queries I could answer easily enough, so it’s all been pro bono until now, but I’m still hoping that all this will someday generate some income…

And all the help I’ve given companies/organisations so far has only amounted to translation work rather than anything as glamorous as “consulting”…

But hey, that’s the idea at least: if it’s something to do with Scotland, I’ll be happy to do it. Oh, and also anything to do with the UK in general (I do say “UK/Scottish Cultural Consultant”, after all). As to England, Wales and Northern Ireland – I’m sure there are other people who are more knowledgeable than me, but if you insist, yeah I’ll do those areas too…

Interested? For enquiries, click here:
Contact Form

Is Scotland cold? – your handy Scottish temperature conversion chart

Often people think Scotland is a cold place, but it’s not. There are areas in Japan (which people often assume to be a hot place) that get much much colder than Scoland ever does. The lowest temperature ever recorded in Scotland is -27.2°C (Braemar, 1982); the lowest in Japan on official record is -41.0°C (Asahikawa, Hokkaido, 1902). The average temperature in the coldest month (January) in Scotland is 2°C; in Hokkaido, the January average is well below the freezing point.

What is true is that Scotland is a cool place in summer – and I’m talking about temperatures, not the festivals (though they are certainly cool too). The average maximum temperature for the hottest month in Scotland is 19°C – even in northern Hokkaido, the average maximum reaches 26°C. The highest temperature ever recorded in Scotland is 32.9°C (Greycrook, 2003). In Osaka, the average maximum temperature for August is 33°C. I lived in central Scotland for a total of 19 years, and I only remember two days when the maximum temperature in my area hit the dizzy height of 30°C.

So far I’ve written this piece using Celsius temperatures. That’s what you see in weather forecasts in Britain nowadays, but when I first moved to Scotland, it was still common to use Fahrenheit, so as someone originally from a metric country, I had to learn the Fahrenheit temperature scale. The following is a post I made on a web forum in a discussion about weather and temperatures.

The UK, including Scotland, is going with the rest of Europe and is now a Celsius country, but when I moved to Scotland so many years ago, weather forecasts were still given in Fahrenheit. Lots of people older than me still prefer to use the old units (F for temperature, inches/feet for measurement, pounds for weight, etc.) so you end up having to learn them just so you know what others are talking about.

I have a simplified scale for Scottish temperature conversion:
30F –> freezing!! (-1C)
40F –> ****** [insert your choice of swear word ] cold! (about 4C)
50F –> cold (10C)
60F –> warm (about 16C)
70F –> hot! (about 21C)
80F –> ****** [insert your choice of swear word ] hot!! (about 27C)

We don’t have to remember 90F in Scotland — it doesn’t happen. LOL

(Okay, the last bit is a lie since the heighest record of 32.9°C is 91.2°F – but don’t forget that we are talking about a record high here. 90°F is 32.2°C.)

*To see the latest weather forecast for Scotland (Edinburgh), see the BBC weather feed.